Agronomy Updates

Is Replant Necessary?

Much of the region has received significant rainfall in the last week, and judging by the questions we’ve received, several of you were wondering how to manage planting before a predicted rain event. Now that planting is further along for many, some of those fields have seedlings emerged or germinating seeds and may now have…

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Determine The Reason For Late Emergence

We’ve all gotten rain and now we’re facing a week of cooler temperatures. These are good conditions for corn to be delayed in emergence and good reasons to scout recently planted fields.   Chilling injury and ponding Chilling injury can occur when seeds take on cold water and/or seedlings are subjected to prolonged cold temperatures….

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Planting Into Cool Fields

Planters are rolling. Even now in late April, soil temperatures are still in the process of warming up and we continue to see April showers. We’re getting questions on when to stop the planter before a predicted rain or temperature drop. At the end of the day, you’re the farmer and it’s your decision, but…

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Trap Counts Are High

We have stressed the importance of keeping accurate field records in many of our previous newsletter issues. We are now encouraging growers to take note of fields with broadleaf weeds, cover crops, or other growth due to insect pheromone traps indicating heavy migration of true armyworm and black cutworm moths into the Midwest. Migrating black…

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Check Your Soil Temperatures

Planting is on the minds of everyone we’ve talked to recently. As you gear up for planting, keep in mind that getting the crop in too early can lead to replant or problems during the growing season.  Soil temperature Corn germination and emergence takes approximately five to seven days if planted in soil 50F or…

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Tips For A Successful Spring Burndown

A successful burndown is key in having a clean slate for planting in no-till fields. We asked Tom Begg, Dow AgroSciences crop protection representative in Ohio, to share his suggestions on an effective spring burndown. “Marestail is a key weed that must be addressed in soybean burndowm programs,” Begg says. “Sixty percent of marestail germinate…

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Spring Is Coming, Wheat Is Here

It’s early March and planting is no longer a far-off thought. It’s coming up. As we head out and meet with growers, two things seem to be top of mind: nitrogen (N) application on wheat and insect overwintering. N application on wheat is best done with a split application or applied one time at Feekes…

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Soybean Harvest Notes

As harvest continues, we’re noticing green stem and purple seed stain in soybeans. These can result in a reduced number of pods and yield reductions. Green Stem Syndrome is a disorder in which stems stay green after pods and seeds reach maturity. Although the exact cause is unknown, symptoms have been associated with insect feeding,…

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Fall Burndown Recommendations

As weather continues to cooperate this harvest season, it looks like Mother Nature will allow us to get some additional work in this fall. No-till farmers should consider fall herbicide applications, especially if you have problems with marestail. In most cases, a properly timed burndown application from mid-October to mid-November will control the weeds that…

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Stalk Lodging

As we continue through harvest, we’re seeing stalk lodging, which is the breakage of the stalk below the ear. Severely lodged corn leads to increased harvest losses, harvest time, drying cost and may result in volunteer corn the following year.  With the amount of stalk rots we’ve been seeing over the past month, it’s not…

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